Fuck Yeah Marjane Satrapi

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Fuck Yeah Marjane Satrapi Greetings to all fans of best selling and award winning Iranian graphic novelist and film director Marjane Satrapi! Feel free to submit away!

American Libraries: Persepolis was banned briefly in 2013 at a high school in Chicago. It was removed from the library because of panels that depict torture. What are your thoughts on that situation?
Marjane Satrapi: It was very bizarre because it came from Chicago. Chicago is not like some place in the middle of nowhere. I thought it was completely stupid. It’s not like I made a porn magazine or something. I was very happy, though, because I saw these children, they were protesting. The good thing is that these people who ban things, it’s like they are completely unaware of what a human being is. If you want to make adolescents read a book, ban it! And then they all want to read it. Why not just explain it? It’s not like kids are dumb.

American Libraries Magazine, September/October 2014

(Source: christinamcclendon)

#quotes  

firstlasttitle:

Persepolis (2007)
Dir: Marjane Satrapi, Vincent Paronnaud
"Fear is what makes us lose our conscience."

otfilms:

Persepolis (2007)

otfilms:

Persepolis (2007)

#gif   #persepolis  

23 Female Cartoonists On Drawing Their Bodies→

"The graphic novel is a man’s world, by and large," wrote Charles McGrath in a New York Times Magazine cover story in 2004. He was right — in a way. Most successful graphic artists and writers were men, and the comic’s industry was and remains exceedingly male-dominated. From R. Crumb, one of the most celebrated comics artists of all time, and his often violent depiction of women, rendered as grotesque, over-accentuated commodities, to the hypersexualized, bra-breaking breasts and quivering thighs of superhero comics, most female bodies in graphic form are enough to make Barbie look realistic.

So what happens when women draw their own bodies in a medium that has represented them so poorly? While graphic books published by men each year still outnumber those by women, the exclusionary landscape of American comics has been called into question. From blockbuster successes like Alison Bechdel’s Fun Home and Marjane Satrapi’s Persepolis, to rising indie artists and vibrant online communities, female cartoonists are producing some of the most exciting work in the genre. Here, 23 successful graphic artists share their illustrations and discuss how women are reshaping a form that has marginalized them nearly since its inception.

(Source: clarawebbwillcutoffyourhead)

kojotai:

Poulet aux prunes (Chicken with plums, 2011) was absolutely gorgeous


Marjane Satrapi is the author of the bestselling graphic novel Persepolis, an account of her life in Iran, which she left when she was 14. “I drew Persepolis with a pedagogical purpose, for the Western public. I had heard so many stupid things about my country. Some thought they knew more than me about Iran, because they had seen Not Without My Daughter [a 1991 film set in Iran] in the cinema! We are often made to feel that a person who emigrates does so for economic reasons. I wanted to show that you leave your home because you can’t breathe any more. In a sense, I censor myself everyday. I’m responsible for what I transmit about Iran. Consequently, that limits my freedom. Words can kill. If I do something wrong in France, I know what I risk. In Iran, you can’t count on anything. For a long time, I thought I was paranoid. Then one day I was supposed to take part in an Iranian cultural event and the [Iranian] embassy in Paris said they wouldn’t take part if I were invited. Censorship is a reality.“

Marjane Satrapi is the author of the bestselling graphic novel Persepolis, an account of her life in Iran, which she left when she was 14. “I drew Persepolis with a pedagogical purpose, for the Western public. I had heard so many stupid things about my country. Some thought they knew more than me about Iran, because they had seen Not Without My Daughter [a 1991 film set in Iran] in the cinema! We are often made to feel that a person who emigrates does so for economic reasons. I wanted to show that you leave your home because you can’t breathe any more. In a sense, I censor myself everyday. I’m responsible for what I transmit about Iran. Consequently, that limits my freedom. Words can kill. If I do something wrong in France, I know what I risk. In Iran, you can’t count on anything. For a long time, I thought I was paranoid. Then one day I was supposed to take part in an Iranian cultural event and the [Iranian] embassy in Paris said they wouldn’t take part if I were invited. Censorship is a reality.“

(Source: sites.colorsmagazine.com, via thebrownqueen)

(Source: uncucno)

usualeight:

The internet is killing me

Happy drawing! How has Marjane Satrapi inspired you? http://fuckyeahmarjanesatrapi.tumblr.com/ask

usualeight:

The internet is killing me

Happy drawing! How has Marjane Satrapi inspired you? http://fuckyeahmarjanesatrapi.tumblr.com/ask

zagremuhina:

poulet aux prunes (2011), marjane satrapi, vincent paronnaud

dianagrcmj:

30 day drawing challenge, day 5. Favourite movie.
Persepolis. A drawing of Marjane Satrapi, I admire her so much!
© Diana García Mejía, 2014

What a wonderful drawing!

dianagrcmj:

30 day drawing challenge, day 5. Favourite movie.

Persepolis. A drawing of Marjane Satrapi, I admire her so much!

© Diana García Mejía, 2014

What a wonderful drawing!

#fanart  

"It’s fear that makes us lose our conscience. It’s also what transforms us into cowards."

"It’s fear that makes us lose our conscience. It’s also what transforms us into cowards."

(Source: clairekincaid)

(Source: jinni.com, via halfcupcinema)

(Source: countvonroo)